Kids Yoga Teacher Training
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Last February, a new yoga book came out and it’s been causing some stir within the yoga community lately. The Science of Yoga is written by William J. Broad, the Pulitzer-prize winning science writer for the New York Times.  He’s also a yoga fan and practitioner.


Become a Yoga Teacher for Kids
http://www.theyogakids.com/yoga-training/

In his new book, Mr. Broad says that “the benefits [of yoga] unquestionably outweigh the risks.”  But the hubbub among yogis and students is mainly over one of the book’s chapters which discusses how injuries can be sustained by practitioners who do not practice asana yoga “intelligently,” and his statement that “yoga can kill and maim.”

Naturally, many in the yoga community are concerned about this chapter.  They feel, as I do, that yoga is not only excellent physical exercise for people of any ability, but that the psychological benefits – reducing stress, reducing pain, improving sleep patterns, increasing the ability to focus, and long-term improvement in self-image – make yoga a safe and beneficial choice for people of all ages.

Not to get nit-picky, but The Science of Yoga’s  chapter on yoga injuries is based on case studies and sketchy interpolation; while the book debunks some debunk-able yoga myths by showing how unscientific they are, the injury chapter itself has no scientific method to back it up either.

That’s OK.  It’s hard to put the results of yoga practice into a scientific study no matter what you’re trying to prove.  (I’ve listed a few links at the end of this blog for my readers who would like to see some actual studies from the scientific horse’s mouth.)


Become a Yoga Teacher for Kids
http://www.theyogakids.com/yoga-training/

Either way, The Science of Yoga is, for the most part, very favorable about yoga, and it’s informative too, if you can get past the slightly superior tone and a few disparaging remarks about people who have been deceased for decades

There’s nothing to fear in yoga as long as you use a little common sense and follow your gut instinct when practicing yoga or choosing a yoga instructor for your child.  Like choosing a school, a doctor, a hairdresser, or a tennis instructor, we all seek out those we can trust, or at least those we believe knows what they’re doing.  It’s the same with yoga, for adults or children.

Our classes are about breathing awareness, balance, mindfulness, ability to focus, being a good person, and valuing ourselves.  The poses we use are chosen for their ability to illustrate and assist these elements, as well as for their ease for children of all abilities.  I believe that our students not only enjoy their yoga classes, but truly benefit from them in many ways.  And that’s good science!

Remember:  If you ever have any concerns or questions about yoga, I am just one quick phone call away!
or:


Kids Yoga Teacher Training
http://www.theyogakids.com/yoga-training/

Harvard University http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Mental_Health_Letter/2009/April/Yoga-for-anxiety-and-depression

Leipzig University http://biodanza-online.com/yoga_for_children.pdf

http://www.youngyogamasters.com/2010/08/11/scientific-studies/

http://yogakids.com/toolsforschools/research


Kids Yoga Teacher Training
http://www.theyogakids.com/yoga-training/